Well, we all know what Anthony Bourdain said and think about the Colombian hot dog. If you haven’t seen it, take a look at The Layover’s Miami Episode. Minute 6:40

“Meh, not so much. I usually head over to get a Colombian mutant hot dog. Colombians like to do strange and wonderful things to their dogs.”
“Wrapping your lips around this is a challenge. I hear that a lot.”


The.Layover.S01E04.Miami by educkling

We love learning Spanish in Colombia and we love Colombian food. This week we talk about and cook a Colombian hot dog, one of the students’ favorite foods. Why? Because is relatively cheap, you can find it almost everywhere and because is delicious.

We made this recipe in our Spanish and cooking class, and as usual, we started with some vocabulary.

Perro caliente: Hot dog
Pan para perro: Hot dog bun
Salchicha: Wiener
Repollo verde: Green cabbage
Mayonesa: Mayonnaise
Salsa de tomate: ketchup

The recipe is very easy, the hot dog (bun and wiener) and 3 very special toppings: cabbage salad or coleslaw salad, melted cheese and crushed potato chips.

What you need
Hot dog buns
Hot dog wieners
Green cabbage
Mayonnaise
Ketchup
Cheese
Potato chips

Make it

In a medium pot bring water to a boil. Add the hot dogs wieners and cover. Cook about 5 – 7 minutes.

Wieners for Colombian hot dogs

Now for the toppings

Grate about ½ cup of green cabbage (you can also use a food processor) and mix it with about 2 tablespoons of mayonnaise.

Coleslaw salad for Colombian hot dogs

Melt the cheese in a saucepan. Use a low-to-medium heat, keeping it on the heat just until melted.

Melted cheese for Colombian hot dogs

Place the wieners in the buns and top with cabbage salad, melted cheese, crushed potato chips, ketchup and mustard.

Colombian hot dog

Sometimes we also like to add some pineapple sauce.

Next time you make a BBQ, try to make it Colombian style

The Old Bogota, La Candelaria, is the historic neighborhood in downtown Bogota. Colombia’s capital was founded there in 1538, and 475 years later, La Candelaria still retains much of its colonial atmosphere.

La candelaria houses several universities, museums, 400 year old churches and the government buildings. There is a lot to do and here is our top 3 museums worthwhile visiting.


Ver La Candelaria top Museums en un mapa más grande

1. The Gold Museum (Museo del Oro): Why visit The Gold Museum? Because you won’t see this magnificent collection of gold work anywhere else.

The Gold Museum collection is one of the biggest in the world, more than 33,000 items of gold and emeralds and other precious materials crafted in pre-Hispanic times.

The gold museum is also part of Google Art project, you can check the virtual gallery here http://g.co/artproject/b65g

For more information about El Museo del Oro check our post.

2. The Botero Museum (Museo de Botero)
Why visit the Botero Museum in Bogota? It is an excellent collection you can visit for free.

It showcases the artwork of renowned Colombian artist, Fernando Botero.

Donated by the artist himself, the museum displays 208 pieces, 123 of his own and 85 by international artists. The collection is available at no charge to the public, on except on Tuesdays which is closed.

The Botero museum is also part of the Google Art project, you can check it here http://g.co/artproject/zsqu

3. Banco de la Republica Art Collection

With more than 5000 art pieces, The Banco de la Republica Art Collection is open to the public free of charge.

It showcases artwork form Colombian, Latin-American and European artists.

Check the gallery here http://www.banrepcultural.org/museos-y-colecciones/coleccion-arte/galeria-imagenes

There are a lot more museums to visit in La Candelaria. Which one is you favorite?

The Botero Museum showcases the artwork of renowned Colombian artist, Fernando Botero. Donated by the artist himself, the museum displays 208 pieces, 123 of his own and 85 by international artists.

The museum is located in the La Candelaria, the historic neighborhood in downtown Bogota, in a colonial house, restored under the guidance and curatorship of the master artist himself.
The collection is available at no charge to the public. During the opening of the Botero Museum, the artist said:

“It is for me an infinite pleasure to know that these works of art belong to Colombia today; to know that the students that come into this building will be in touch with the most significant artistic pieces of our times, being able to contemplate, on a permanent basis, original artwork made by great masters; and to know that lovers of painting and sculpture can come visit this haven of peace and stroll quietly through the halls, allowing themselves to be enveloped by modern aesthetics.”

Some activities offered are guided tours, lectures, conferences, and workshops for children and teachers

More about its collection here http://www.banrepcultural.org/museo-botero/la-coleccion

The The Botero museum is also part of the Google Art project, you can check it here http://g.co/artproject/zsqu


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Photo Attribution: By Andrew Bertram (World66) [CC-BY-SA-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The Gold Museum (Museo del Oro) showcases the work of art of Colombia’s first inhabitants, who believed gold was the materialization of the Sun as life-giving energy god.

Its collection also includes objects like pottery, stone and wood and more than 33,000 items of gold and emeralds and other precious materials crafted in pre-Hispanic times.

One of the most important pieces in the gallery is the he Muisca Raft “Balsa Muisca”, cast in one sole piece using the lost wax technique in a clay mold, made of extremely pure gold (over 80%) with native silver and copper alloy. It has been interpreted as the representation of El dorado Ceremony.

You can preview the exhibition in 26 panoramic and interactive images here
http://www.banrepcultural.org/gold-museum/tour-of-the-gold-museum-in-360

The Gold Museum is also part of theGoogle Art project [/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Our students love their Spanish courses in Colombia and we all love Valentine’s Day.

Together we chose these 3 songs for this Valentine’s Day 2013

1 Cabas, Bonita.

2. Siam, No existe

3. Mojito Lite, Amnesia

Hope you have a very Spanish Valentine’s Day!!

We are very proud of our very own Juanes. He recently won his first Anglo Grammy at the 55th annual Grammy Awards.

Juanes brought home the Best Latin Pop Album for his MTV Unplugged Juanes Album , which also won a Latin Grammy for Album of the Year in 2012.

Juanes performed his own version of Elton John’s Your Song in English and Spanish, during the 55th Grammy Awards in Los Angeles

Here are the lyrics, including the Spanish version.

It’s a little bit funny this feeling inside
I’m not one of those who can easily hide
I don’t have much money but boy if I did
I’d buy a big house where we both could live

…Y tú puedes decirle a todos
que esta es tu canción
y aunque suene un poco simple
lo que te digo hoy…
I hope you don’t mind
I hope you don’t mind that I put down in words
How wonderful life is while you’re in the world

Congrats Juanes!!!

Also check Juanes Acoustic performance at On Air with Ryan Seacrest

One of the Spanish Courses we have is the Intensive Spanish + Cooking Course and this recipe was used for one of our classes.

We started our Spanish + Cooking class like usual, reviewing and learning the new words.

This time the recipe was simple, “fried plantain bananas” and I promised the students to tell them the best kept-secret of the Colombian cuisine: How to cut perfect plantain banana chips.

Cutting perfect plantain banana chips is not a secret per se, it is just a big piece of knowledge I’m passing to our students; it is the way home chefs do it, and by home chefs I mean our moms. I learned it watching my mother and my grandmother cooking.

Plantains go through various stages of ripeness, evidenced by the color of their skin. They start green, then yellow with black patches and then, at the peak of their ripeness they become completely black.

The yellow ones with black patches or the black ones are the ones you need for this recipe.

colombian recipe plantain banana

What You Need
Plantain bananas
1/2 cup of vegetable oil

Make It

Start by cutting off the tips, and then make a small cut all down the center, just to get the skin cut. Then peel it with your hands, it will come out easily.

colombian recipe plantain banana how to cut

The key to perfect fried plantain bananas is how you cut them; you want to do it in a long angular shape. And this is the secret, cut them in your hands, no need for a cooking table, just take the plantain banana in your hands and start cutting them diagonally and every slice will be perfect.

Take a look at the photos

colombian recipe plantain banana how to cut them

colombian recipe plantain banana how to cut them

In a large pan, heat about 1/2 cup of vegetable oil over medium-high heat, then add the plantain slices and cook about 2 minutes on each side. Use neutral tasting oil such as canola or vegetable oil for this.

colombian recipe plantain banana frying

Remove from pan and transfer the slices to a paper towel-lined plate and serve them warm.

colombian recipe plantain banana ready

What do you think? Do you think you can handle the heat?

[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent=”yes” overflow=”visible”][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”][fusion_dropcap]1[/fusion_dropcap]First, our one and fabulous Colombian singer Juanes showing us how to say “manos, cabeza y pies”. Muévete with Juanes, Elmo and Rosita

[/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”][fusion_dropcap]2[/fusion_dropcap]Spanish G Word Song with Rosita. Rosita, Sesame Street Spanish speaking character, sings about the letter “G”. On this video we can hear words like “Grillo”, “Gracias” and “Gallo. With a catchy rhythm, this song helps us to learn this sound.

[/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”][fusion_dropcap]3[/fusion_dropcap]We chose this song because it teaches us an important aspect of the Spanish language: The letter “H” which is a silent letter with no pronunciation. So practice with Grover’s ode to the “Zanahoria”

[/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”][fusion_dropcap]4[/fusion_dropcap]On this video Colombian actress Sophia Vergara and Elmo show us what “Baile” means.

[/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”][fusion_dropcap]5[/fusion_dropcap]And Finally, here is a list of videos (lots of them) from Sesame Street Website “Fun with Spanish”
We certainly can enhance our vocabulary in a fun way http://www.sesamestreet.org/playlists#media/playlist_198

Hope you enjoy our selection. Live us a comment if you liked it.
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This week in one of our Spanish classes we talked about what makes us happy and found a very clever Colombian saying.

“Barriga llena, Corazón contento” which translates as: full tummy, happy heart.

But what does that mean? Is it just about food? We certainly don’t think that way. We think “Barriga llena, Corazón contento” means everything looks different when you have fulfilled all your basic needs, like food, shelter, health and you feel O.K. about life and any problems you may have.

What do you think? Knowing you have food for you and you family makes you feel good about life? Please leave us your comments.

Check the pronunciation here: