There are 20 countries where Spanish is the official language. So, imagine how diverse the language gets!

Every country has its own accent and its own dialect. One of the most beautiful dialects is Colombian Spanish. People usually say they like the language because of the accent. They also say it’s clear and easy to understand.

Within the country, there are also different accents and dialects. When we talk about Colombian Spanish we refer to the dialect spoken in Bogota. If you want to learn more about Colombian different accents read our previous post, Colombian Spanish accents: what you need to know.

Getting to know the local slang and expressions might not be easy, but it’s vital since they are used in everyday life.

In today’s article, we will explain the meaning of 20 verbs we use in Colombian Spanish. Make sure you also read of the post “30 Colombian slangs and what they mean”, it will help you to understand better how Colombians speak.

1. Regalar (me regala)

Literal meaning: “to gift” or “to give as a gift”,

Slang meaning: To give

Colombian way: Buenas Vecina, ¿me regala una cerveza?
Good morning “neighbor”, could you give me a beer, please?

Colombian Spanish Slang: Me regala

This is one of the most used verbs in Colombia.

Many people, even native Spanish speakers from other countries, get confused when hearing:

me regala un café” or “me regalas una cerveza”.

Why?

In standard Spanish “regalar” means “to give something as a gift”.

In other Spanish speaking countries for ordering a coffee people would say:

“Me da un café, por favor”

But in Colombia, we would say:

“Me regala un café, por favor”

It’s just a polite way to ask for something, whether it’s food, drinks or even when asking someone for a moment to talk:

“Me regalas un minuto? Tengo que decirte algo”

Do you have a minute, I need to tell you something

The verb “regalar” is used as synonymous of the verb “dar” (to give) only in Colombia.

Don’t be surprised if you hear stories of Colombian people that ordered a coffee or beer in countries like Spain or Argentina and the waiter/waitress answer:

“No, lo siento. Acá no regalamos nada” (No, sorry. Here we don’t give things for free”

2. Arrunchar(se)

Literal meaning: None

Slang meaning: To cuddle

Colombian way: “Está lloviendo hoy, arrunchémonos a ver una peli”
It’s raining today, let’s stay in bed, cuddle and watch a movie

Colombian Spanish Slang: Arruncharse

Arruncharse is basically lie in bed and cuddle, watch a movie, sleep or whatever but it’s meant to be a very easy and lazy plan to do.

3. Dar una vuelta

Literal meaning: To give a turn

Slang meaning: To go for a walk/ride, to walk around, to hang out

Colombian way: “¿Qué haces? Estoy aburrida en casa. ¿Vamos a dar una vuelta?
What are you doing? I’m bored at home. Shall we go for a walk?

Colombian Spanish Slang: Dar una vuelta

4. Hacer una vuelta

Literal meaning: To do a loop, to do a turn

Slang meaning: To do a favor for somebody, to run errands, or to do any sort of obligation of your own.

Colombian way: “¿Nos vemos esta tarde? Dale, pero primero tengo que hacer unas vueltas. Veámonos al final de la tarde.
Shall we meet this afternoon? Sure, but first I have some things to do. Let’s meet late afternoon.

Colombian Spanish Slang: Hacer una vuelta

5. Hacer una vaca

Literal meaning: To make a cow

Slang meaning: To chip in

Colombian way: “Hagamos una vaca para comprar pizza”
Let’s chip in to buy a pizza.

Colombian Spanish Slang: Hacer vaca

6. Rumbear

Slang meaning: To party

Colombian way: “Este viernes es el cumple de Antonia. Vamos a rumbear!”
This Friday is Antonia’s birthday. Let’s party!

Watch out, if you hear the verb in its reflexive form, it doesn’t mean “to party” but “to kiss somebody”
“Nos rumbeamos anoche”
We kissed last night

Colombian Spanish Slang: Rumbear

7. Picar

Literal meaning: To chop

Slang meaning: To snack

Colombian way: “Tengo un poco de hambre. Pedimos algo para picar?”
I’m kind of hungry. Shall we order something for snacking?

Colombian Spanish Slang: Picar

8. Dar Papaya (No dar papaya)

Literal meaning: To give papaya (Don’t give papaya)

Slang meaning: It’s a common expression in Colombia. It’s difficult to translate but when people use it they mean:

Don’t expose yourself to danger and don’t make it easy for thieves. Don’t lower your guard, have common sense. Don’t put yourself in a position where you become vulnerable to be taken advantage of.

Colombian way: “No dejes tu teléfono sobre la mesa. No des papaya”
Don’t leave your phone on the table. “No des papaya” (somebody could steal it)

Colombian Spanish Slang: Dar papaya

9. Camellar (camello)

Literal meaning: To camel. It’s a verb made from the animal word “camel”

Slang meaning: To work. A job or a task that requires a lot of effort.

Colombian way: “Quieres ir a escalar este finde? – No, no puedo. Tengo que camellar todo el finde”
Do you want to go climbing this weekend? – No, I can’t. I’m working all weekend.

Colombian Spanish Slang: Camellar

10. Prestar (Me prestas)

Literal meaning: To lend something

Slang meaning: It’s also used when asking someone to lend you something. However, it’s also a polite way of asking to use the toilet.

Colombian way: “¿Me prestas el baño, por favor?
Could I use your bathroom, please?

Colombian Spanish Slang: Prestar

11. Poner los cachos

Literal meaning: To put on horns

Slang meaning: To cheat on the partner

Colombian way: “Juan le puso los cachos a Diana. Ella está súper triste por eso”
Juan cheated on Diana. She’s really down about it.

Colombian Spanish Slang: Poner los cachos

12. Estar Prendido/Prendida

Literal meaning: To be lit

Slang meaning: To be buzzed

Colombian way: “¡Me tomé dos tragos y ya estoy prendido!”
I’ve drunken two cocktails already. I’m buzzed!

Colombian Spanish Slang: Prendido

13. Caer

Literal meaning: To fall

Slang meaning: To hit on someone

Colombian way: “Mira, ese es el man que me está cayendo”
Look, that is the guy who is hitting on me

This verb has other meaning depending on the context

Slang meaning 2: to drop by at someone’s

Colombian way: “Llámame mañana y te caigo después del trabajo.”
Call me tomorrow and I’ll drop by after work.

Colombian Spanish Slang: Caer

14. Mamar Gallo

Literal meaning: Suck a rooster

Slang meaning: To make fun of someone, to tease, to pull someone’s leg

Colombian way: “¡Deje de mamarme gallo!
Stop pulling my leg!

¡No te enojes, sólo te estaba mamando gallo!
Don’t get mad, I was just teasing you!

Colombian Spanish Slang: Mamar gallo

15. Cuadrar

Literal meaning: To square up

Slang meaning: To arrange a meeting, to organize, schedule a date, to plan, to coordinate.

Colombian way: “Cuadremos algo para mañana.”
Let’s plan something for tomorrow

Colombian Spanish Slang: Cuadrar

16. Embarrar

Literal meaning: To smear

Slang meaning: To mess up, to ruin, to screw up

Colombian way:
“¡La embarré!”
I messed it up!

Colombian Spanish Slang: Embarrar

17. Parar bolas

Literal meaning: To stand balls

Slang meaning: To pay attention, to listen

Colombian way:
¡Párame bolas!
Listen to me!

“Pero, ¿me estás parando bolas?”
But, are you paying attention to me?

18. Meter la pata

Literal meaning: Put the foot in

Slang meaning: To screw up something

Colombian way: “Le dije a Juana que su hermana tenía un regalo para ella. Pero ¡Juana no sabía! ¡Metí la pata!”
I told Juana her sister had a present for her. But Juana didn’t know! I screw it up!

Colombian Spanish Slang: Meter la pata

19. Estar enguayabado

Guayabo is the noun, hangover, while “estar enguayabado” is the verb

Literal meaning: To be stuck in a guava tree

Slang meaning: To be hungover

Colombian way: “Ayer salimos con mis compañeros del trabajo. Estoy super enguayabado”
Yesterday we went out with my colleagues. I’m hungover

Colombian Spanish Slang: Guayabo

20 Dejar plantado / plantada

Literal meaning: To leave something/someone planted

Slang meaning: To leave someone waiting, don’t show up for a date

Colombian way: “Quedamos de salir ayer con Julio, pero me de plantada!”
I was planning to meet Julio yesterday, but he never showed up!

So there you have it, 20 Colombian slang phrases to use on your daily dialogue. Which are your favorites? Let us know in the comments below if you think we’ve missed any!